Retina Display Sizes Analyzed by gdgt: A Comprehensive Review

Enthusiasts of Apple products have been buzzing with excitement since the unveiling of the MacBook Pro with Retina display. The screen’s quality is undeniably stunning, marking a significant step forward for Mac’s visual capabilities.

In light of this, gdgt’s Ryan Block explored what resolutions would be necessary for other Mac models to match the pixel density of the new MacBook Pro.

Block analyzed the existing pixel density and dimensions of Mac displays to determine what would be required to reach the 220 pixels per inch (PPI) seen in the MacBook Pro’s Retina display. He pointed out that it’s not merely about doubling the pixel density; for instance, the 11″ MacBook Air already boasts a 135 PPI display, which wouldn’t need to double to meet Retina standards.

Here are some of Block’s intriguing findings:

13″ MacBook Air
Current Resolution: 1440 x 900, Estimated Retina Resolution: 2560 x 1600

13″ MacBook Pro
Current Resolution: 1280 x 600, Estimated Retina Resolution: 2560 x 1600

11″ MacBook Air
Current Resolution: 1366 x 768, Estimated Retina Resolution: 2200-2300 x 1200-1300

27″ iMac and Thunderbolt Display
Current Resolution: 2560 x 1440, Estimated Retina Resolution: 5120 x 2880

21.5″ iMac
Current Resolution: 1920 x 1080, Estimated Retina Resolution: 3840 x 2160
(Block suggests that the 21.5″ Retina iMac might exceed this resolution)

While these projections are speculative, they spark interesting discussions about the future of Apple’s display technology.

What are your thoughts? Do you believe Apple will roll out Retina displays across its entire Mac lineup soon? Share your opinions in the comments section below.

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Damien

George is a dedicated writer for TUAW, your go-to source for all things Apple. With a keen eye for detail and a love for technology, George brings the latest news and insights on Apple products like the iPhone, iPad, MacBook, and Apple Watch. His articles are both informative and engaging, making complex tech topics easy to understand. When he’s not writing, George enjoys exploring new apps and testing out the latest gadgets.