Associated Press Develops New iPad App, Sources Say

According to a recent report by Business Insider’s The Wire, the Associated Press is developing a subscription-based news application for the iPad, which will feature content from both the AP and over a thousand of its member organizations. This move follows similar developments by other news entities like the New York Times, who are also venturing into app creation for Apple’s new device.

While the release date of the AP app is not confirmed to coincide with the iPad’s debut next month, there is anticipation that it could attract users of the AP’s popular free iPhone app, who might be willing to pay for a more feature-rich version on the iPad.

The app might initially be offered for free to draw in early users.

From a recent announcement by the AP:

“The organization is set to introduce a paid application for the iPad, Apple Inc.’s upcoming tablet computer, at the end of March. Pricing details are still under discussion, but the app may initially be offered at no cost,” said Jane Seagrave, the soon-to-be chief revenue officer of AP.

“The app will feature a mix of news, photos, and videos from the AP and its members, who will also have the opportunity to create their own iPad apps using the same platform and share in the generated revenue.”

The development of the iPad app is part of a broader initiative by the AP, dubbed “AP Gateway,” which focuses on enhancing the organization’s mobile digital offerings. This initiative comes at a time when traditional news outlets are struggling to find profitable business models in the digital age.

Scott

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